Question: Can I Take SSRI Forever?

Do SSRIs cause long term damage?

During long-term SSRI therapy, the most troubling adverse effects are sexual dysfunction, weight gain, and sleep disturbance..

What are the long term side effects of antidepressants?

Overall, they did say they were less depressed and had a better quality of life because of the drugs, but about 30% still said they had moderate or severe depression. The main side effects they complained about included: Sexual problems (72%), including the inability to reach orgasm (65%) Weight gain (65%)

How long can you take SSRIs for?

It’s usually recommended that a course of SSRIs lasts at least 6 months to prevent your condition recurring when you stop. However, if you’ve experienced previous episodes of depression, a 2-year course may be recommended. Some people with recurring problems are advised to carry on taking medication indefinitely.

What is considered long term use of antidepressants?

Long-term—even indefinite—use of antidepressants may be the best treatment for someone with multiple past episodes of depression, especially if they have a history of suicide attempts or have residual symptoms, like sleep problems, says Dr.

How long should you stay on antidepressants?

Take your time. Clinicians generally recommend staying on the medication for six to nine months before considering going off antidepressants. If you’ve had three or more recurrences of depression, make that at least two years.

Do antidepressants make you less smart?

A single dose of SSRI antidepressants such as Fluoxetine, shown here, can change the brain’s functional connectivity within three hours, a new study found.

Does your brain go back to normal after antidepressants?

The process of healing the brain takes quite a bit longer than recovery from the acute symptoms. In fact, our best estimates are that it takes 6 to 9 months after you are no longer symptomatically depressed for your brain to entirely recover cognitive function and resilience.

What is a brain zap?

Brain zaps are electrical shock sensations in the brain. They can happen in a person who is decreasing or stopping their use of certain medications, particularly antidepressants. Brain zaps are not harmful and will not damage the brain. However, they can be bothersome, disorienting, and disruptive to sleep.

What happens if you take SSRIs when you don’t need them?

There’s a word of warning after research on monkeys finds that an SSRI antidepressant may alter brain architecture if taken by those who aren’t really depressed. There is new reason to be cautious about using popular antidepressants in people who are not really depressed.

Is it OK to stay on antidepressants forever?

Long-term—even indefinite—use of antidepressants may be the best treatment for someone with multiple past episodes of depression, especially if they have a history of suicide attempts or have residual symptoms, like sleep problems, says Dr. Potash.

Do SSRIs permanently change your brain?

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) such as Prozac are regularly used to treat severe anxiety and depression. They work by immediately increasing the amount of serotonin in the brain and by causing long term changes in brain function.

What is the mildest antidepressant?

These medications generally cause fewer bothersome side effects and are less likely to cause problems at higher therapeutic doses than other types of antidepressants are. SSRIs include fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil, Pexeva), sertraline (Zoloft), citalopram (Celexa) and escitalopram (Lexapro).

Can antidepressants permanently damage your brain?

We know that antipsychotics shrink the brain in a dose-dependent manner (4) and benzodiazepines, antidepressants and ADHD drugs also seem to cause permanent brain damage (5).

Which SSRI is best for anxiety?

The antidepressants most widely prescribed for anxiety are SSRIs such as Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil, Lexapro, and Celexa.

Do you have to take anxiety medication forever?

General guidelines for treatment suggest that for a first treatment episode, keeping people on medication once they fully respond and are essentially free of symptoms for somewhere around a year or two years seems prudent and reasonable.

What is the hardest antidepressant to come off of?

Hardest-to-Stop Antidepressantscitalopram) (Celexa)escitalopram (Lexapro)paroxetine (Paxil)sertraline (Zoloft)

What is the safest antidepressant?

The results showed the most acceptable antidepressants were agomelatine, citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, sertraline, and vortioxetine; least acceptable (ones with the highest dropout rates) were amitriptyline, clomipramine, duloxetine, fluvoxamine, reboxetine, trazodone, and venlafaxine.

What is the #1 antidepressant?

Zoloft is the most commonly prescribed antidepressant; nearly 17% of those survey in the 2017 antidepressant use study reported that they had taken this medication. 1 Paxil (paroxetine): You might be more likely to have sexual side effects if you choose Paxil over other antidepressants.